Scott R. Ellarson

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BARNEVELD–Scott R. Ellarson, 64, passed away Sunday, June 16, 2019 following complications from a stroke he suffered while turkey hunting on May 10.  He was born in Madison WI November 25, 1954, the son of Dr. Robert S. and Jean C. (Kintzele) Ellarson. 

Scott attended Madison West High School and graduated in 1973. He worked as a foreman at Kast-Rite Silos, Inc. from 1973-1980 where he quickly became a legend in the silo building industry. With a desire to further his education, he attended Madison Area Technical College and graduated on May 16, 1986 with an Associate Degree in Applied Science for Civil Engineering Technology. On March 9, 1987, he was employed by the City of Middleton as their Engineering Technician and in 2003 he was appointed Chief Building Inspector. After 30 years of dedicated public service, he retired on March 9, 2017. Scott was President and co-owner of Urban Wildlife Specialists, Inc., a successful company developed in 1996 with his brother, Bruce, and life-long friends, Bill and Gary Ishmael. Their company specialized in urban/suburban deer removal and operated until 2016. From 1987 until his passing, he worked for the U.W. Arboretum’s wildlife management program.

In 1997 he met his future wife, Sandra Maiden, and they were married on June 9, 2000 near the Montreal River on a cliff overlooking Lake Superior. They were married for 19 loving, beautiful years and throughout that time he taught her how to hunt, fish and more. 

In 2009, they moved from Madison to Iowa County to carry on the family tradition of restoring habitat on “The Farm” his family purchased in 1962. Scott spent a lifetime honing his skills there and readily shared his knowledge of the outdoors with family and friends. 

In 2012, he and Sandy purchased a cabin on the Flambeau River in Price County and spent many hours renovating it with the help of family. They loved their cabin and especially loved their exciting fishing trips down the river where Scott skillfully rowed “Drifty” down rapids and around boulders. He never missed the opportunity to guide his family and friends on fishing trips for musky, walleye and smallmouth bass. Many people were fortunate to spend time with Scott on his boat trolling for salmon on Lake Michigan, fishing for steelhead on its tributaries or fishing bluegills year around on his cherished farm pond.

Scott loved his family and was especially proud of his sons and cherished the time spent with them, hunting, fishing, cutting wood, working on projects and sharing his knowledge and enthusiasm for the environment. Together, they loved planting trees, restoring the native eco system in acres of wetlands, savannahs, hard woods and prairies. He was the consummate outdoorsman; an expert hunter, fisherman, woodsman and trapper. Scott loved gardening, listening to the blues and was passionate about cooking. He was the head chef for all the family gatherings at “The Farm.” He supplemented his wild game and fish with the bounty he harvested from the large garden he and Sandy tended each year.  

All who knew him will remember Scott’s wonderful smile, sense of humor and great laugh. He was an exceptionally kind man and never missed an opportunity to extend his kindness and support to others in need. He was a giver, had a huge heart, loved deeply and lived life to its fullest. He was a positive influence on more people than he ever realized. Scott thought he was an incredibly lucky and fortunate man; some of his favorite quotes were “I’m living the dream”, “We are blessed” and “Life is good.” 

Scott is survived by his loving wife Sandy, his son’s Tory, Riley and Brady, his brother and best friend Bruce (Chris) Ellarson, nephew’s Wesley and Casey and his Aunt Mokey, many cousins and his beloved dog’s Joey and Bailey. He will be dearly missed by all his family and friends.

The family is grateful for the loving support of friends, neighbors and especially Aunt Mokey during this difficult time. Scott’s “Celebration of Life” will be held at a later date for “One Last Cast.”

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