Fire Department Reminds Residents to Change Smoke Detector Batteries

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MIDDLETON–As daylight savings time begins on Nov. 1 the Middleton Fire District wants to remind residents to make another change that could save their lives–changing the batteries in their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors.

Communities nationwide witness tragic home fire deaths each year. Non-working smoke alarms rob residents of the protective benefits home fire safety devices were designed to provide. The most commonly cited cause of non-working smoke alarms: worn or missing batteries.

Changing smoke alarm batteries at least twice per year is one of the simplest, most effective ways to reduce these tragic deaths and injuries. In fact, working smoke alarms nearly cut in half the risk of dying in a home fire. Additionally, the International Association of Fire Chiefs recommends replacing your smoke alarms every 10 years.

To save lives and prevent needless injuries, the Middleton Fire District has joined the “Change Your Clock, Change Your Battery” campaign. The program urges all Americans to adopt a simple, lifesaving habit: changing smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector batteries when changing clocks to daylight savings time. The peak time for home fire fatalities is between 10 p.m.-6 a.m. when most families are sleeping. Smoke alarm maintenance is a simple, effective way to reduce home fire deaths. A working smoke alarm can give your family the extra seconds you need to get out of a home fire safely.

In addition, the Middleton Fire District recommends residents use the “extra” hour they save from the time change to test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors by pushing the test button, planning “two ways out” and practicing escape routes with the entire family. Families should also consider the use of both piezoelectric and ionization smoke detectors for the best protection from slow smoldering and fast open flame fires. If you have children, you may also want to install talking smoke detectors near the children’s bedrooms. Studies have shown that younger children tend to sleep through smoke detector activation. During these studies the children awoke to the talking smoke detectors more often because the message was recorded by the parents and used the child’s name.

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