People’s Maps Commission Seeks Public Comment  

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By: 
Linda Schwanke

WISCONSIN–The People’s Maps Commission will hold a virtual public hearing for the 2nd Congressional on Thursday, March 11, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. to seek public input on the upcoming redistricting of legislative maps. All Wisconsin residents are encouraged to watch and participate. 

The hearing is one in a series of at least eight meetings, one for each one of Wisconsin’s eight congressional districts. The virtual public hearing will include testimony from subject matter experts and also provide Wisconsinites the opportunity to express how they have been affected by legislative redistricting and share their ideas for how Wisconsin can work together to achieve fair maps.        

The hearing is the Commission’s eighth and final congressional district hearing as part of the Commission's initial round of public hearings. The virtual public hearing will include testimony from subject matter experts and also provide Wisconsinites the opportunity to express how they have been affected by legislative redistricting and share their ideas for how Wisconsin can work together to achieve fair maps.        

The deadline for registering to comment during this hearing is 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 9. Each speaker will have three minutes to speak. Registration is on a first-come, first-serve basis, with priority to residents of Wisconsin’s 2nd Congressional District.  

For anyone unable to join the virtual hearing, written comments are strongly encouraged. Written comments can be submitted at any time using the feedback form available on the People’s Maps Commission website at https://govstatus.egov.com/peoplesmaps. Written comments will be reviewed by the commissioners and are public record.  

Selected by a three judge panel, the commission is a nine-member nonpartisan redistricting commission charged with drawing fair, impartial maps for the state of Wisconsin. More information about the Commission, its members and its activities is available on the website.

Every 10 years, each state redraws their legislative and congressional districts using data from the decennial census. In addition to the data from the 2020 U.S. Census, the commission will use information gathered during the public hearing process to prepare new maps. It will then be up to the legislature to take up and approve the maps created by the commission.  

Due to the COVID-19 public health emergency, the People’s Maps Commission is hosting virtual public districts. 

Since 2011, Wisconsin has been widely referred to as one of the most politically gerrymandered states in the nation. Most Wisconsinites believe they should get to choose their elected officials, not the other way around. That means that there needs to be a nonpartisan, transparent, and fair redistricting process. 

Over the past several years, 51 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties, representing approximately 78 percent of Wisconsinites, have passed resolutions or referenda supporting nonpartisan redistricting. Governor Tony Evers created the People’s Maps Commission in Executive Order #66 to give the people of Wisconsin the opportunity to provide direct input, discourage partisan bias, and increasing transparency in the redistricting process. 

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